The Blog

HOTTER TEMPERATURES COULD MEAN MORE HEAT- RELATED ILLNESSES, REPORT SAYS:

Rising temperatures triggering extreme weather events around the world could result in an increase in heat-related illness and deaths, as well as the threat of new infectious diseases, according to scientists at johns Hopkins University. A paper published in the journal of clinical investigation says that with climate change, we can expect cases of heat cramps, heat exhaustion, and potentially fatal heat strokes to climb. Extreme heat will particularly impact children, older people, people who suffer from chronic conditions and those who live in underserved communities.

  • Extreme weather killed thousands in the U.S and caused hundreds in damage over the last 10 year.
  • Greenland’s ice sheet melting seven times faster than in 1990s.
  • The Amazon lost the equivalent of 8.4 million soccer fields this decade.
  • Carbon dioxide is at its highest level in 3 million years.
  • Climate- fueled disasters displace 1 person every 2 seconds, report says.

HOW DOES CLIMATE CHANGE AFFECT BUSHFIRES?

  1. A LONGER FIRE SEASON:

Hotter condition means a longer fire season, leading to more dangerous bushfires and leaving less time for hazard reduction.

  1. HOTTER TEMPERATURES:

Australia is getting hotter, with more extreme hot days and longer, hotter heat waves. These conditions are increasing the risk of bushfires in many areas.

  1. DRIVER VEGETATION & “FUEL”:

Hotter conditions and periods of low rainfall dry out soil and vegetation, increasing fire risk.

  1. MORE LIGHTNING:

A warmer climate increases the chance of lightening, which is a key factor in starting fires.

  • It wasn’t your imagination -2019 was a historically warm year. Warmer –than –usual weather dominated forecasts around the globe, and June, July and September ended up breaking or trying high temperature records, according to the national oceanic and atmospheric administration. A United Nations report published in November painted a bleak picture of the planet’s warming climate, nothing that the commitments courtiers pledged to limit the climate crisis are nowhere near enough to stave off record- high temperatures. The time for “rapid and transformational” change to limit global warming is now, the report said.

Carbon dioxide emissions are expected to reach another record high this year, a new report said, with scientists warming the world is losing time to make the drastic reductions needed to avert a climate catastrophe. The report from the global carbon project, a research organization that tracks greenhouse gas emissions, expects a 0.6% increase in emissions in 2019 from the previous year. Bright spots in the report came from the US and Europe, which both cut their carbon emissions by 1.7% this year, mainly from significantly reducing their use of coal.